what? who? where?


sartorialist dress

Check out this dress, shot by the Sartorialist in Milan at the DSquared show.

Is it even necessary for me to say I want it? Well, I do. I'm assuming, since it was worn in the vicinity of a fashion show, that it costs eighty bazillion dollars and you had to sign up on a waiting list five months ago (probably in a stark white boutique somewhere) to get one. Well, I say "feh!" to that. Find me a better picture and I'll make one. Except mine will have a slightly fuller skirt. And will possibly be olive with paisley, instead of maroon.

So, anyone know anything about this dress? Other than how great it is, of course.

I also like how (unlike most people I see in fashion show photos) she doesn't seem to be someone who considers three cigarettes and ten minutes of sunshine "lunch".

0 thoughts on “what? who? where?

  1. I ADORE that dress pretty much as is. I like the windowpane effect. Very cool! But sadly no info. If you find some, will you let me know.msk

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  2. OK, I don’t have info on that dress either. But I wanted to note that Duro-inspired (or “kimono-inspired”) dresses are in Lucky this month, if you haven’t seen it yet.

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  3. I found your blog a few weeks ago, and I visit it regularly now. Love the dresses! Wish I had time to make a few myself…This dress looks beautiful and comfortable. I have no info on it, unfortunately. I do think it would be a nice dress to highlight some interesting kimono fabric, though.

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  4. If you can’t find an actual pattern for this, I don’t think it would be too difficult to cobble it from an existing shirtwaist dress pattern. But, darling, if you make and wear this, please tell me you’ll tie the sash snugly, ‘K? Thanks.*kiss*kiss*–Lydia

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  5. I agree. The belt would look nicer if tied a little more snugly. I love border/scarf prints like this one. I hope someone finds out where this is from because I want it, too!

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  6. I envision a young (therefore in b&w) Giulietta Masina crossing a piazza,also wearing dark glasses and her hair under a scarf, wearing this dress. Although this dress has a style and print which are are both classic it manages to create such a fresh look.The last time I was in Milan I had a psychotic reaction due to the fact that I was the only female in town above a size 2. I made myself feel better by going to the Brera and standing near some of Titian’s paintings of chubbier models. So yes, it is nice to see a less carcinogenic model.Someone needs to tell the guy in the background that he’s in Italy, not Brazil!

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  7. I loved this dress when I saw it on “sartorialist,” too. It’s just plain fab.I have seen at JoAnn a fabric that’s almost a mini-version of the white/black/red print(it comes in white/black/blue, too); but it’s the huge print that makes this dress so great. And I can’t think of anything except home decor fabric that would come printed on such a huge scale. *sigh* (P.S. I think that the last time I was a size 2 was sometime before 5th grade…)

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  8. Catching up on my blog reading, so if I’m repeating previous comments, I apologize.I just wanted to note that this style of dress with the framed panels would be a good way to use that 15 inch wide kimono fabric you featured in an earlier post, and depending on what you select for your contrasting fabric and how much you use of it, you may not need to get an entire ten yards.

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  9. You can still use home decorating fabric. Well, some of them. I have a favorite dress from college that I made out of baby blue brocade (drape material) with a sweetheart neckline and full gored skirt, very 1950’s. Went to a wedding in it and the first thing the bride said to me was ‘I love your dress.’

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  10. Oooh, I like the brown version of the dress (on the Derhy site)even better!You can never lose with a shirtwaist dress. (I think that should be engraved in stone somewhere).

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  11. Oh, that’s such a great idea–use the kimono fabric. I don’t even sew and I’m addicted to this blog. So much so that I check it a couple of times a day to read the comments. I think I said this before, I want this dress.

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  12. I’m another new visitor who can’t sew, and loves your writing and the photos. It could *almost* inspire me to learn to sew, it is that fun!

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  13. I love shirt dresses and I like the print on this one! I’d like to make one myself, unfortunately my biggest weakness is sewing anything with sleeves and collars(I’m still working on it though)so I’m just gonna have to put a project like this on hold…

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  14. I would like this dress in the colors you suggested Erin. She does not have cigarettes in her mouth and she is in euorope that’s freaken amazing!!! I was just telling dh that I want to go to Milan when we go overseas the next time. I guess Milan is off my list. Im not a size 2. I don’t think I could handle everyone around me being a size 2 if I went to Milan. I believe it would really depress me.I was in the bar bussiness for a lot of years. The girls that were thiner then me always made more money then me. I have to tell you after a few years it really took a toll on me. I used to get so upset,depressed and cry and cry.I finaly got out of the bussiness and I feel so much better. My mama and dh are much happier too.

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  15. I am wearing home dec fabric right now. A big circle skirt made from Ikea fabric. I wish I could find a link to it online: it’s gray, white, olive, and chartreuse triangles.

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  16. Oooh, oooh, another one here for Home Dec fabric!!! Especially since I love paisley. I also love Urban Outfitters. No, not for their deconstructed clothing, since I like mine very constructed indeed (although I did get a nice little pair of pewter leather boots for about 90% off, yay me!); for their faboo home dec fabric. They have had some wonderful things: beautiful saris (of which I did not get enough, because dopey me figured “they’d always have some”), and their bedcovers: beautiful handwoven, handblocked Indian fabrics in traditional prints and colours, *snip* *snip*. And their curtain fabrics: gauzy handwoven cottens; I got a batch of airy handwoven white muslin pieces with silver threads running through them; mmmmm, Regency dress! And yummy opulent brocades. Home dec fabrics: lovely, sturdy, and you don’t see yourself coming and going!I bet if Erin makes this dress, not only will she tie the sash properly, the waistline won’t slant unless she wants it to.For the folks who are mightily tempted to at least think about sewing: not only can you read “how to” sewing books, to decide if you find the thought truly enticing, you can also, these days, buy or rent DVDs and videos that show you how. And you can replay them over and over, until you understand something, unlike being in a class where you might miss something, and then it doesn’t get repeated.

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