Do You Recognize This Pattern?

Aunt at the Prom

Not the woman, we know who the woman is — it's C.'s aunt, and this was a prom gown she thinks was made by her grandmother in the 1960s. She's trying to figure out what pattern it was made from.

I'm pretty sure I've seen this pattern, too, but it's not like I can just reach into the giant toppling pile of paper that is my mind and pull out a post-it with "Simplicity XXXX!" written on it. Would that I could …

If your mind is better-filed than mine, and you know what this pattern is (or can make a good guess) want to leave a comment?

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37 thoughts on “Do You Recognize This Pattern?

  1. Both patterns are similar… Simplicity 5718 has the released darts in the skirt, but Cs aunts dress has a deeper scoop neckline… the McCall 7057 has a gathering on the skirt and Cs aunts dress is not not gathered. What a stunning dress.. with the shoes and gloves. She has a lovely figure and looks gorgeous!

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  2. This would have been a fairly popular style in the 60s, so its likely that there are several patterns out that would be close. It could also be a frankenpattern as another poster suggested.Pretty dress, and the wearer looks gorgeous!

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  3. I love the color she chose – looks great in the satin finish. I think the key to this pattern is the flower at her waist. That would have to be included in the pattern.

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  4. Sandritocrats Vogue 5767 does look very close. McCalls 6571 might also work, although Im not sure about the darts on the skirt and the neckline might be a bit lower.

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  5. Wow, such class! looking at pictures like this is like eating comfort food…it gives you a warm glow and you think that nothing bad will happen to you! Thanks for sharing. I did see this pattern somewhere…hmmm…and I think Jackie Kennedy wore very similar syles often.

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  6. Wow! Thanks so much for all of the pattern tips! I will definitely try to track these down and pass on the compliments to my aunt 🙂

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  7. P.S. I will ask my aunt if she remembers anything about this dress and how/why it was made. I also just want to mention how great it is that a bunch of people with a common interest can come together and share things like 50-year-old pictures of prom dresses over the Internet. I never got to talk with my grandmother about sewing, since I only began to learn a few months before she passed away, so Im glad that other people find clothes like these as intriguing and fun to make as I do (ok, taking the Miss America hat off now 🙂 )

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  8. That photo is like a visual time capsule! Every detail – the oufit, the hair and makeup, the paneling, the flooring, the bookcase contents, the flooring, the chair – says 1964 to me.Now if the actual photo is displayed in a thin, goldtone frame – that will be the final touch!

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  9. Does it have a sweetheart neckline?I admired the totally period look of the photo, too. I love the display of shells from the Florida vacation. It was the vacation at that time.

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  10. As SOON as I saw it, I thought gah! The McCalls Day to Night one that Tina posted (McCalls 7057). The neckline, the waist seaming, the slightly belled hips.. thats my guess, too!

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  11. Tiny waist, full hips, fitted midriff — Id have killed for that pattern in 1959-62. After that I had babies and lost the 22 waist.

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  12. Lisa: Thanks for the link to McCall 7057 The short version with the jacket makes me think of a 1963 mistress whisked off to Paris for the weekend. Dont forget to pack your hairpiece! (Could also wear to Divorce Court to make your husband mad.)

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  13. Im telling my age, but I had a dress very similar to this one in 1966. It was a Vogue pattern my mom made for a winter dance. The back had a low scoop. I felt beautiful in it!

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  14. This is the pattern used for my wedding gown, but had a lace jacket over the top. It is still in my closet in a plastic bag since l964. Maybe one of my granddaughters might think it is neat some day.

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