At Long Last I've Found You


The funny thing is that I didn't know I desperately needed this pattern (McCall's 5433, for those of you playing at home) until I saw it. And then I was all "you must — must, I say! — be mine." (Luckily, when I saw the pattern it was on eBay, so that was easy.)

The only dark spot in my otherwise unmarred expanse of joy is that the cummerbund is a cummerbund, and not an actual midriff band. But that can be … dealt with. Also: the gored skirt is going to be pocketized. (That's a given.)

Anyway: I cannot WAIT to make this, let alone wear it. Question: in what fabric should this humdinger first take flight? No brocade, I want to wear this every day.

(I'm also thinking of using this skirt with the bodice of the BurdaStyle Heidi. Thoughts?)

Scary Chic


I almost didn't post this fantastic dress (pattern on Etsy from Sandritocat) because of how painfully thin the model in the photo is — she's not smiling, she just moved her lips aside so we could see her clenched teeth —  and she looks so cold! Thank goodness for those pockets, at least her hands are warm.

Luckily, the illustrated view is a bit less grim.

This isn't my size (neither is the model) but if you're on the more petite side (and under 11 feet tall, which this model also seems to be) you might want to snap this up. It's much chic-er than I remember the 1970s being (and much chic-er than I was in the 1970s, although, to be fair, nobody in elementary school was wearing stuff like this, either). I wish it were my size, because I know I personally have about twenty-five yards of various shirting cottons that would work for a dress like this … 

You Couldn't Handle Us, Little Boy


This is from Out of the Ashes, Sheila's store, and I don't think you can tell that this pattern is B40. Except, of course, from the Mrs. Robinson stare of Print Dress, and the downright predatory gaze of Gray Dress behind her.

I don't think all the "Women's" dress patterns from the 1960s are this … overt, but this one sure is.

Wait, There Were Oscars?

Advance 7942 Suzy Perette

I kid, I kid. At some point I will look at the pictures and opine, but really, in the Universe According to Erin, Christina Hendricks shows up in this Suzy Perette number, and everyone else goes home.

Christina, if you need this, check out the eBay auction. There's still time to bid! 

Airship Hostess Recruiting Campaign


If I were recruiting for a new elite corps of airline hostesses (and who's to say I'm not?) I would definitely make this the uniform. See how cleverly the sergeant's stripes are incorporated into the bodice?

Thanks to Tammy O. for sending the link — the eBay auction ends, like, nowish, so jump if you want it.

Oh, and I think the model in gray is holding a swagger stick, yes? 

Oh for the Love of Pete!

So do you remember The Uniform Project? Woman wears the same dress every day for a year, raises money for charity, great idea, yadda yadda.

Even cooler, she made a pattern for the dress, and is selling the pattern … except: by buying the pattern (for $25, including $2 extra to her charity) you agree to this wackaloon EULA:

I acknowledge that the designs and patterns (the "Dress Patterns") offered for sale on this website are protected by copyright, trademark and other intellectual property rights controlled by Uniform Project. I agree that I may use the Dress Patterns only for personal, non-commercial purposes. For the purpose of clarity, I shall not use any item of clothing created through use of the Dress Patterns (the "Dress") in any commercial advertising, film, television, print or online media, nor shall any Dress be sold to third parties without the prior written consent of Uniform Project. For the avoidance of doubt, no prior written consent shall be required to post photos or videos of any Dress on a non-commercial website.

There are so many things wrong with this. Where to start?

— First, this agreement would prohibit you from donating a dress to Goodwill or selling it at a yard sale.  And IANAL, but I think this is permitted under the right of first sale: in other words, once you buy something, especially a physical object, it is your right to sell it as you choose. 

— It's pretty standard for commercial sewing patterns (Vogue, etc.) to say you can't use the pattern to make garments commercially, but — you don't want to anyway. But saying you can't wear the dress on TV? Why not? Do they seriously think that if someone shows up wearing this dress in, say, a Mentos commercial it infringes their trademark? What if you are photographed for a "man on the street" segment? (And the founder of the project works in advertising, or did, which makes this all the more head-scratchy.) 

— Again, IANAL, but as far as I know, you cannot copyright a fashion design in the US (in fact, Diane Von Furstenberg has been trying to change that for years, in part to protect her iconic wrap dress) but only the printed pattern (or you can trademark a logo, which is part of the reason why huge logos are so prevalent these days). (And I'm not an expert in using the USPTO site, but I didn't even see a trademark registered for the Uniform Project, under that name.) 

— And what makes something a non-commercial website? I run ads, is this site commercial? (That's why there's no picture of the dress or pattern here, although I think their restriction makes no sense.) What about someone who makes butter-and-egg money from Amazon affiliate links? Who gets free products for review?

Does anyone (perhaps someone who is a lawyer) know why buying a dress pattern would be saddled with such a restrictive agreement? I can't imagine the possible "tort" that would necessitate this kind of heavy-handed protection. Does someone wearing this dress in an ad really injure the Uniform Project in a substantive way? 

Needless to say, they lost my business. 

Vogue 5121: Girl's Night Out


Birgit sent me the link to this ages ago — I can't believe it's still available at her shop. Don't these girls look out for a good time?  They all look loaded for bear, but my money is on the brunette in teal. 

I think view D is the prettiest dress — even in basic black. 

The fundraiser is still going strong — remember, if we hit $1200 by Christmas, there's a new Secret Lives story coming! And there are still 3 or 4 prepublication copies of Secret Lives up for grabs for the next few donors …



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